Your Source for Six Month Braces and Porcelain Veneers

Sunday, February 25, 2018

Is Sparkling Water Bad for My Teeth?

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

Is the satisfying fizz of your favorite sparkling water putting you at risk for tooth decay? Because any drink with carbonation-including sparkling water-has a higher acid level, some reports have questioned whether sipping sparkling water will weaken your tooth enamel (the hard outer shell of your teeth where cavities first form).

So, Is Sparkling Water Affecting My Teeth?
According to available research, sparkling water is generally fine for your teeth-and here's why. In a study using teeth that were removed as a part of treatment and donated for research, researchers tested to see whether sparkling water would attack tooth enamel more aggressively than regular lab water. The result? The two forms of water were about the same in their effects on tooth enamel. This finding suggests that, even though sparkling water is slightly more acidic than ordinary water, it's all just water to your teeth. 

Tips for Enjoying Sparkling Water-and Protecting Your Teeth

  • Sparkling water is far better for your teeth than sugary drinks. In addition, be sure to drink plenty of regular, fluoridated water, too-it’s the best beverage for your teeth. Water with fluoride naturally helps fight cavities, washes away the leftover food cavity-causing bacteria feast on and keeps your mouth from becoming dry (which can put you at a higher risk of cavities). 
  • Be mindful of what’s in your sparkling water. Citrus-flavored waters often have higher acid levels that does increase the risk of damage to your enamel. Plan to enjoy these in one sitting or with meals. This way, you aren’t sipping it throughout the day and exposing your teeth over and over again to the slightly higher level of acid it contains.
  • Sparkling water brands with added sugar can no longer be considered just sparkling water. They are a sugar-sweetened beverage, which can contribute to your risk of developing cavities. So remember-sparkling or not-plain water is always the best choice.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Teeth Grinding Night Guards - Palm Beach Smiles

Are your teeth slowly disappearing?

  • Have you been told you have "TMJ?"
  • Do you have worn teeth or are they getting shorter?
  • Are all your upper front teeth the same length? (They're not supposed to be.)
  • Are your facial, neck, or shoulder muscles tense in the morning? In the afternoon?
  • Do you catch yourself clenching your teeth during stressful times?
  • Do you get frequent headaches?
  • Do you have notches in the sides of your teeth at the gum line? You can feel them with your fingernail typically.
  • Do your teeth hurt or are they sensitive?
  • Do your jaw joints (TMJ) click or pop? Are they tender or sore? Has your jaw ever locked open or closed?
  • Are your teeth chipping? Or are you breaking fillings and crowns?
Night grinding and clenching of teeth is major cause of tooth loss. While many patients are not aware of this nocturnal habit, the damage done can be significant. If the damage is severe, extensive reconstructive treatment may be necessary. However, if caught early, this damage can be prevented easily.


Prevention

A customized night guard is an effective way to prevent damage to your teeth, TMJ (jaw joints), and muscles. Other benefits may include reduced frequency and intensity of headaches. A night guard is a custom-fitted device that is worn similarly to a retainer while you sleep. Think of it as a "helmet for your teeth."

Many "migraine" headaches may be related to clenching at night. Some of Dr. Barr's patients have had a remarkable reduction of migraine headaches by wearing a night guard. Ask him to tell you some of the remarkable patient stories!

Treatment

A misaligned bite can cause damage and discomfort, as well. Treatment almost always begins (and often ends) with a night guard. But it may include selective reshaping of the biting surfaces, restorative treatment, orthodontics, or a combination of these.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Friday, February 23, 2018

Recognizing and Treating Oral Thrush

Recognizing and Treating Oral Thrush
Oral thrush, also known oral candidiasis, is a condition that occurs when a fungus called Candida albicans builds up on the lining of your mouth.

Anyone can develop oral thrush, but babies, young children, older adults, or anyone with a compromised immune system due to an illness such as HIV are more susceptible. Conversely, candidiasis lesions can be an early sign of an HIV infection.

The main symptom of oral thrush is creamy white lesions in the mouth, usually on the tongue or inner cheeks. In some cases, the lesions may appear on the roof of the mouth or on the back of the throat.

Interestingly, oral thrush is not caused by poor oral hygiene. Thrush is caused when the naturally occurring fungi in the body get out of balance, which is why the very old, very young, and people with weak immune systems are at higher risk. Good oral hygiene, however, is an essential part of treating oral thrush. Healthy adults and children can recover fairly easily from the infection, especially if they follow a complete oral care routine of twice-daily tooth brushing and daily proper flossing.

To read the entire article please visit: OralB.com

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Thursday, February 22, 2018

Why X-Rays?

Learn what the American Dental Association's answer is to the question: "Why X-Ray?".


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Tooth Abscess Symptoms And Treatment

Symptoms And Treatment Of Tooth Abscess
If you have a toothache that goes beyond mild to moderate tooth pain and reaches a level of severe, throbbing pain, it could be a sign of a tooth abscess. A tooth abscess is a pus-filled lesion at the roots of a tooth, and is caused by an infection. The first sign is a throbbing toothache that won’t go away.

At first, the tooth will likely be sensitive to chewing and biting, as well as to heat and cold. You also may develop a fever, swollen lymph nodes in your jaw or neck, or swelling on your face.

If the abscess ruptures, you’ll know because of the nasty-tasting discharge in your mouth. Although the pain may recede if the abscess ruptures, you still need to be treated by a dentist in order to get rid of the infection, save the tooth and avoid complications. If the abscess doesn’t rupture, the infection can spread to other parts of the body. This is not a problem to ignore.

Treatment will likely include draining the abscess if it hasn’t ruptured. Your dentist also may recommend that you take over-the-counter pain relievers, rinse your mouth with warm salt water, and take antibiotics. More severe abscesses may require a root canal to remove infected tissue, and the worst cases require extraction of the tooth.

A tooth abscess can get its start as an untreated tooth cavity, so the best way to prevent an abscess is to prevent the cavity in the first place by following a consistent oral health routine of twice daily tooth brushing and daily flossing. Regular visits to your dentist are important too, especially if you’ve been treated for an abscess. This allows your dentist to confirm that the infection has cleared.

The above article is from: OralB.com

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Sunday, February 18, 2018

Boynton Beach Dentist: Palm Beach Smiles - Porcelain Veneers



Nature didn't give you a perfect smile? Do you wish you could wave a magic wand and have a smile that projects your true personality?

Porcelain Veneers are a breakthrough in cosmetic dentistry. Veneers are a thin "shell" of porcelain that are bonded to your teeth. Veneers enable you to change the color, shape, and alignment of your teeth in just two visits in many cases.

Veneers are more durable than conventional "bonding." Because they are made of porcelain, they are very strong and are resistant to staining and chipping. An additional advantage of Porcelain Veneers is that they are a more conservative procedure than crowns.

Porcelain Veneers are a cosmetic treatment for a variety of dental conditions including:
  • Spaces or gaps.
  • Broken or chipped teeth.
  • Stained or discolored teeth.
  • Crooked teeth.
The change in your appearance after a "smile lift" can be dramatic. When you look good, you feel good, and the people around you take notice. Projecting an image of self-confidence can be life-changing!

Dr. Michael Barr is a Porcelain Veneer Expert who has
helped teach dentists from around the world exquisite smile design techniques. If you're a resident of Boynton Beach, or the greater Palm Beach County area, your opportunity for a gorgeous smile is waiting for you!

To see before and after photographs of actual cases done by Dr. Barr, click on Porcelain Veneer Photos.


Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Friday, February 16, 2018

Causes and Treatment of Canker Sores

Cold Sores and Canker Sores Compared
It’s easy to confuse cold sores and canker sores.

Unlike a cold sore, a canker sore is not contagious, and it appears on the inside tissues of the mouth rather than the outer surface of the lip (which is where cold sores appear). A canker sore, also known as an apthous ulcer, looks like a small, round or oval lesion that has a white or yellowish center surrounded by red. They tend to be indented, like a crater, rather than raised, like a bump.

Canker sores most often appear on the inside of the cheeks and lips or at the base of the gum. Canker sores are not usually associated with bleeding gums, so if you are experiencing bleeding gums you should see your dentist to be evaluated for possible gum disease.

The majority of canker sores are mild. Mild canker sores are less than one-third of an inch long and usually heal on their own after a few weeks.

But major apthous ulcers, defined as larger than 10 mm in size, can take more than a month to heal and can cause scarring when they finally do heal. So it’s important to visit your doctor or dentist if you have a canker sore that has persisted for more than a few weeks. These large ulcers are most common in young adults after puberty, and they are more likely to recur than smaller sores. Older adults are more prone to herpetiform lesions, in which dozens of tiny lesions group together to form a large ulcer.

The exact cause of canker sores remains uncertain, but possible factors include an allergic reaction to bacteria in the mouth, a minor injury to the inside of the mouth due to dental work or poorly fitting dental appliances, food allergies or health problems, such as celiac disease and inflammatory bowel diseases.

Although most canker sores resolve on their own, if you have a large or stubborn lesion, your dentist may prescribe an antibiotic mouth rinse, topical paste to apply to the lesion, or a nutritional supplement if poor nutrition may be the cause of the canker sore.

The above article is from: OralB.com

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Tartar

Tartar is a deposit that forms when plaque hardens on the tooth. Individuals vary greatly in their susceptibility to tartar buildup. For many, these deposits build up faster with age. Tartar is easily noticeable because of its yellow or brown color on teeth.

What Causes Tartar Buildup
When plaque accumulates and is not removed from teeth, it can harden and turn into tartar. Because tartar buildup bonds strongly to enamel, it can only be removed by a dental professional.

Help Prevent Tartar Buildup
While tartar can only be removed by a dental professional, you can avoid tartar buildup by removing plaque. To help prevent tartar, be sure to brush your teeth at least twice daily, preferably with a tartar-control fluoride toothpaste like many from Crest, and floss once a day with a product like GlideƆ. And visit your dental office regularly for oral exams and cleanings.

Above article from: Crest.com

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Diabetes and Your Mouth # 6: Floss Every Day

Flossing helps control plaque. It can reach where a toothbrush can't, like between the teeth. Floss daily with floss and interdental cleaners that carry the American Dental Association (ADA) seal. Ask your dentist for tips if you're not sure how to floss. Like everything else, flossing gets easier with practice.

The above article is from: WebMD.com

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Monday, February 12, 2018

Tips for keeping a beautiful smile!

Keeping your teeth clean, smooth and beautiful...
Proper oral hygiene is your key to a healthy, beautiful smile. Here are our and the American Dental Association's recommendations for at home care:

  • Brush 2-3 times every day with a flouride toothpaste (it doesn't matter which brand)
  • Floss once a day
  • Eat a healthy diet (fruits, vegetables, etc)
  • Limit consumption of sugary foodsand beverages. Soda drinks can destroy teeth faster than almost anything else
  • Eliminate or at least limit use of alchol, chewing tabacco, and cigarettes

We also recommend using an electric high-speed toothbrush in conjuction with a  waterpik for your daily at-home oral care.

And don't forget six-month professional cleanings and checkups. The American Dnetal Association recommends checkups every six months for those ages four and older.

Professional cleanings by qualified hygienists will remove bacteria and plaque, which can cause serious dental problems if not kept in check.

If you have not been seen recently call our office for an appointment!

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

What are the Stages of Gum Disease?

What is Gum Disease?

Gum disease is an inflammation of the gums that can progress to affect the bone that surrounds and supports your teeth. It is caused by the bacteria in plaque, a sticky, colorless film that constantly forms on your teeth. If not removed through daily brushing and flossing, plaque can build up and the bacteria infect not only your gums and teeth, but eventually the gum tissue and bone that support the teeth. This can cause them to become loose, fall out or have to be removed by a dentist.
There are three stages of gum disease:

  • Gingivitis: this is the earliest stage of gum disease, an inflammation of the gums caused by plaque buildup at the gumline. If daily brushing and flossing do not remove the plaque, it produces toxins (poisons) that can irritate the gum tissue, causing gingivitis. You may notice some bleeding during brushing and flossing. At this early stage in gum disease, damage can be reversed, since the bone and connective tissue that hold the teeth in place are not yet affected.
  • Periodontitis: at this stage, the supporting bone and fibers that hold your teeth in place are irreversibly damaged. Your gums may begin to form a pocket below the gumline, which traps food and plaque. Proper dental treatment and improved home care can usually help prevent further damage.
  • Advanced Periodontitis: in this final stage of gum disease, the fibers and bone supporting your teeth are destroyed, which can cause your teeth to shift or loosen. This can affect your bite and, if aggressive treatment can't save them, teeth may need to be removed.

Read the rest of the article at Colgate.com to learn more about how to know if you have gum disease and how gum disease is treated. 

 


















The above article is from: Colgate.com

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Saturday, February 10, 2018

Bioactive Glass Leads to Longer-Lasting Fillings

Dentists complete 122 million composite tooth restorations in the United States each year, according to Oregon State University (OSU). But the average lifetime of posterior dental composites is only 6 years. Bioactive glass may improve their durability and provide some of the minerals that have been lost to tooth decay.

“Bioactive glass, which is a type of crushed glass that is able to interact with the body, has been used in some types of bone healing for decades,” said Jamie Kruzic, a professor at the OSU college of engineering. The hard and stiff material can replace the inert glass fillers now mixed with polymers to make modern composite tooth fillings.

“This type of glass is only beginning to see use in dentistry, and our research shows it may be very promising for tooth fillings,” he said. “The bacteria in the mouth that help cause cavities don’t seem to like this type of glass and are less likely to colonize on fillings that incorporate it. This could have a significant impact on the future of dentistry.”

Bioactive glass is made with compounds such as silicon oxide, calcium oxide, and phosphorous oxide, and it looks like powdered glass. Its antimicrobial effect is attributed, in part, to the release of ions such as those from calcium and phosphate that have a toxic effect on oral bacteria and tend to neutralize the local acidic environment.

“Almost all fillings will eventually fail,” Kruzic said. “New tooth decay often begins at the interface of a filling and the tooth and is called secondary tooth decay. The tooth is literally being eroded and demineralized at that surface.” 

To read the entire article, please visit DentistryToday.com

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Chew on this: Six dental myths debunked

Myth 1: The consequences of poor oral health are restricted to the mouth

Expectant mothers may not know that what they eat affects the tooth development of the fetus. Poor nutrition during pregnancy may make the unborn child more likely to have tooth decay later in life. “Between the ages of 14 weeks to four months, deficiencies in calcium, vitamin D, vitamin A, protein and calories could result in oral defects,” says Carole Palmer, EdD, RD, professor at TUSDM and head of the division of nutrition and oral health promotion in the department of public health and community service. Some data also suggest that lack of adequate vitamin B6 or B12 could be a risk factor for cleft lip and cleft palate formation.

In children, tooth decay is the most prevalent disease, about five times more common than childhood asthma. “If a child’s mouth hurts due to tooth decay, he/she is less likely to be able to concentrate at school and is more likely to be eating foods that are easier to chew but that are less nutritious. Foods such as donuts and pastries are often lower in nutritional quality and higher in sugar content than more nutritious foods that require chewing, like fruits and vegetables,” says Palmer. “Oral complications combined with poor diet can also contribute to cognitive and growth problems and can contribute to obesity.”

Myth 2: More sugar means more tooth decay

It isn’t the amount of sugar you eat; it is the amount of time that the sugar has contact with the teeth. “Foods such as slowly-dissolving candies and soda are in the mouth for longer periods of time. This increases the amount of time teeth are exposed to the acids formed by oral bacteria from the sugars,” says Palmer.

Some research shows that teens obtain about 40 percent of their carbohydrate intake from soft drinks. This constant beverage use increases the risk of tooth decay. Sugar-free carbonated drinks and acidic beverages, such as lemonade, are often considered safer for teeth than sugared beverages but can also contribute to demineralization of tooth enamel if consumed regularly.

To read the entire article written by Medardo Chua, please visit IDentalAccess.com


Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Diabetes and Your Mouth # 5: Brush Daily, Brush Right

Brushing your teeth twice a day not only keeps your breath sweet, but also helps rid the mouth of bacteria that makes up plaque and can lead to oral infections. To brush properly, point bristles at a 45-degree angle against the gums. Use gentle back-and-forth strokes all over your teeth -- in front, in back, and on chewing surfaces -- for two minutes. If holding a toothbrush is hard for you, try an electric toothbrush. Also brush your gums and tongue.

The above article is from: WebMD.com

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Monday, February 5, 2018

To Floss or Not to Floss..

Lately, there has been a lot of talk about flossing and if it is good or not! Kind of reminds me of coffee, some studies say is good for you and others say it isn't.

Our dental office believes that flossing is beneficial to a person's general oral health. Our staff is trained to address the issues of proper flossing to our patients on an individual need basis. We promote many different tools used to effectively and safely clean between the teeth.

If you are concerned with the recent news reports, please give our office a call to schedule an appointment. We will be happy to review your concerns and make sure you are properly caring for your teeth.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Saturday, February 3, 2018

Three Oral Hygiene Tips for Men

When it comes to personal oral hygiene, not all men are as attentive to their teeth as women. Starting with the checkup, surveys suggests men are more likely to see a dentist only in the event of a problem. So, guys, learn how to step up your oral care routine with the following tips for maintaining a healthy smile and preventing oral health problems before they start.

Toothbrush Tips
Brushing is just one part of keeping your mouth clean - doing so twice a day, in particular. However, the average man brushes his teeth 1.9 times a day, according to the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD). It's not enough to brush quickly and be on your way; two minutes of thorough cleaning is your most effective approach. Keep in mind you don't need to brush hard during this process. Use a soft-bristled brush such as Colgate® Slim Soft™ and brush gently at a 45-degree angle.

Some helpful hints: Replace your toothbrush every three to four months, rinse it after each use and store it in an upright position to air dry. Storing it in a container actually allows microorganisms to grow on the brush, explains the American Dental Association (ADA), so it's best to avoid this method.

Sports and Dental Injuries
Playing contact sports can lead to trauma in unexpected places, and this includes broken, chipped or lost teeth. Wear a mouthguard when you're on the field and a helmet when you're on your bike. Ultimately, see your dentist as soon as possible after experiencing an incident to quickly assess the damage and determine what can be done to fix it.

To read the entire article written by Margie Monin Dombrowski, please visit Colgate.com 

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Thursday, February 1, 2018

Replacing Missing Teeth

Are Missing Teeth Leaving Your Smile Empty?

In our culture, a nice smile is part of the "dress code." The "photoshopped" photo is an effective, if not amusing, demonstration of the importance of even a single tooth in your smile. Missing teeth can have a significant negative impact on how people perceive you. 
Missing teeth carry the stigma of being presumed less intelligent or that you don't care for yourself. This can curb your career path and certainly your social life.

Missing teeth are quite common. In the U.S., there is an average of 7 missing teeth per adult. And the percentage of adults with no teeth at all is 10%.

When teeth are missing, the remaining teeth take a heavier load and will be more prone to problems themselves. We normally have 28 teeth (not counting wisdom teeth), and they are designed to work together as a system. Once a tooth is lost and not replaced, it typically begins a vicious cycle of tooth loss. Missing teeth can cause the surrounding teeth to collapse or tilt. This can then lead to bite problems and even gum problems. Missing teeth may also lead to changes in your facial structure and appearance, such as sunken cheeks and flat or drooping lips.

There are three ways to replace teeth:

Click on the links to learn about each)
  1. Dental Implants.
  2. "Fixed Bridges."
  3. Removable Partial Dentures or Complete Dentures in the case of having no teeth at all.
Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/