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Monday, November 12, 2018

What (and How) to Eat When You're Having Dental Issues: Braces or Canker Sore

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org 

You know that what you eat directly impacts your health, and that includes the health of your teeth and gums. But it can work the other way around too. If you have an orthodontic appliance, such as braces, or have had certain dental problems or procedures, the health and comfort of your teeth and gums can directly impact what you eat. Here are some tips for what to eat and how to avoid these common dental issues.

Braces
Braces are delicate, and any foods that are sticky, chewy or hard can easily cause them to break, including:

  • ice
  • nuts
  • popcorn
  • hard candy
  • gum

Any food that you need to bite into to eat is prime for breaking braces. You can get around this by cutting the food, such as corn off the cob or rib meat off the bone, or slicing apples and chopping carrots into small, bite-size pieces. You may also experience problems eating after your braces are tightened-teeth may feel sore. The first few days are the worst, so try eating softer foods like those listed below until the soreness passes:

  • scrambled eggs
  • oatmeal
  • soup with soft vegetables or pureed or cream soups
  • soft cheeses, including cottage cheese
  • smoothies and milkshakes

Canker Sores
There is no cure for canker sores but you may be able to reduce how often you get them by avoiding foods that irritate your mouth. Spicy foods, acidic foods like pickles and sauerkraut, and citrus fruits can cause irritation. If you have canker sores, help ease discomfort by eating bland foods until your sores heal, such as: 

  • low-fat milk and other dairy foods
  • cooked, canned and frozen vegetables
  • mashed potatoes (fortify by mixing in powdered milk to boost nutrition)
  • cooked or canned fruit, including applesauce
  • hot cereals like oatmeal and cream of wheat (make with milk instead of water to boost nutrition)

If you get mouth sores, try these tips to make eating easier and speed healing:

  • Choose cool or room temperature foods.
  • Blend and moisten dry or solid foods.
  • Drink through a straw to bypass mouth sores. 
  • Eat high protein, high calorie foods to speed up healing time. For example, add protein powder to milk shakes or powdered dry milk to fortify mashed potatoes and soups.

The lists above are partial, please read the entire article at MouthHealthy.org to view the full lists.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Monday, November 5, 2018

What (and How) to Eat When You're Having Dental Issues: Dry Mouth or Oral Surgery & Implants

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org 

You know that what you eat directly impacts your health, and that includes the health of your teeth and gums. But it can work the other way around too. If you have an orthodontic appliance, such as braces, or have had certain dental problems or procedures, the health and comfort of your teeth and gums can directly impact what you eat. Here are some tips for what to eat and how to avoid these common dental issues.

Dry Mouth
Dry mouth is not a normal part of aging. If you have dry mouth, talk to your dentist or doctor. Dry mouth can be a sign of certain diseases or can be caused by certain medications or the result of medical treatments. If you have dry mouth:

  • don’t use tobacco or drink alcohol 
  • drink water regularly-with and between meals
  • avoid drinks that contain caffeine such as colas, coffee and tea since it can dry out your mouth
  • chew sugarless gum or suck on sugarless candy to stimulate saliva flow 
  • avoid spicy or salty foods if they cause pain in your mouth
  • moisten dry foods with soup, broth, gravy, butter or margarine, or sauce. Dip or soak your food in what you’re drinking.

Oral Surgery and Implants
Your nutrition and dietary needs following oral surgery or getting implants depends on factors including your nutritional status prior to your procedure, the extent of your procedure, how much impact there is on oral function and how long your recovery is expected to last. A liquid or soft foods diet may be required for a few days or longer, until your mouth heals. Opt for nutrient-rich foods such as fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy foods and lean meats, eggs and beans whenever possible since they provide vitamins, minerals and nutrients needed for healing, including zinc, protein, and vitamins A and C.
Try these foods:

  • scrambled eggs 
  • oatmeal or cream of wheat (make with milk instead of water to boost nutrition) 
  • soup with soft vegetables or pureed or cream soups
  • soft cheeses, including cottage cheese
  • smoothies and milkshakes 

The lists above are parital, please read the entire article at MouthHealthy.org to view the full lists.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Overcoming Dental Anxiety

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about overcoming dental anxiety.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Monday, October 29, 2018

What (and How) to Eat When You're Having Dental Issues: Problems Chewing or Swallowing

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org 

You know that what you eat directly impacts your health, and that includes the health of your teeth and gums. But it can work the other way around too. If you have an orthodontic appliance, such as braces, or have had certain dental problems or procedures, the health and comfort of your teeth and gums can directly impact what you eat. Here are some tips for what to eat and how to avoid these common dental issues.

Problems Chewing
Chewing problems may be caused by tooth loss, gum disease, cavities and ill-fitting dentures, so your first step should be a visit to your dentist to help determine the cause of your problem. Meanwhile, eating soft foods (see tips for braces) can you help maintain your nutrients until you can see your dentist.

Problems Swallowing
Swallowing problems can occasionally happen, but if it persists, talk to your doctor since it could be related to something serious. Causes of swallowing issues vary and treatment depends on what is causing the problem. 

If you are having trouble swallowing, to prevent choking and aspiration avoid these foods:

  • alcoholic beverages
  • extremely hot foods and beverages
  • caffeine
  • spicy foods
  • popcorn

Depending on level of swallowing difficulty, the following foods may be included in the diet. These foods are grouped into four different categories:

  • Thin liquids that dissolve quickly in the mouth such as frozen yogurt, ice cream, gelatin and broth.
  • Nectar-like liquids where liquid coats and drips off a spoon such as nectars, milkshakes, cream soup and vegetable juices. 
  • Honey-like liquids that flow off a spoon in a ribbon like in yogurt, tomato sauce and honey.
  • Spoon-thick liquids that are thickened to pudding consistency such as pudding, custard or hot cereal.

The lists above are partial, please read the entire article at MouthHealthy.org to view the full lists.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Dental Check-ups

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about dental check-ups!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Monday, October 22, 2018

Emergency Dentistry

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about Emergency Dentistry!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
https://palmbeach-smiles.com/emergency_dentist.htm

Saturday, October 13, 2018

Why Are My Teeth Sensitive to Sugar?

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Crest.com 

Do you have a sweet tooth, but cringe in pain every time you enjoy a sweet treat? If you have teeth sensitive to sugar, you may wonder if there’s any way to get relief. This likely means that the enamel of your teeth is damaged, and is making your teeth sensitive to sweets and other foods. Fortunately, for those whose teeth are sensitive to sugar, there are solutions to help you enjoy your favorite foods and avoid discomfort. 

To read the entire article visit Crest.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:


Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Saturday, October 6, 2018

What are Wisdom Teeth? Purpose, Symptoms & When They Come In

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Crest.com

Wisdom teeth grow in at the back of the mouth, behind your molars. There is a set on the bottom as well as the top. Wisdom teeth often grow in crooked, sideways, or otherwise misaligned. As they grow in, they can push on other teeth, causing problems of overcrowding and misalignment for them as well.

Function and Purpose of Wisdom Teeth
Wisdom teeth are believed to be "evolutionary relics," and were helpful to our distant ancestors who ate diets that consisted of rougher foods like sticks and reed plants. As teeth wore down or fell out, wisdom teeth provided replacements. Nowadays, with modern advancements in oral hygiene and softer diets, we don’t need these replacement teeth, but they still grow in. Essentially, our mouths can hold 28 teeth, but including wisdom teeth, we have about 32 teeth all vying for space. Wisdom teeth symptoms such as overcrowding, bone and nerve damage, infection, etc. can all result.

To read the entire article visit Crest.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:


Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Dental Assistant

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about the role played by your Dental Assistant!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Saturday, September 29, 2018

Dr. Oz Says Dentists Are Scamming You!

Dr. Oz says dentists are scamming you!

I've written about Dr. Oz's dental segments several times before.  My opinion of his "journalistic acumen," clinical accuracy, and advice has not been flattering.  He seems to have it in for dentists, sometimes.  Though, I understand the financial incentives of making "good television."  I also understand that there ARE instances of the story being told in this new segment about inconsistencies in the dental profession. 

Yesterday's "Dr. Oz" episode (Sept 28, 2018) featured a segment, "Undercover Investigation:  Could Your Dentist Be Scamming You?"

https://www.doctoroz.com/episode/undercover-investigation-dental-scams-are-you-being-overdiagnosed-and-overcharged?video_id=5841028832001
Screenshot from video preview.  Click on the image to go to Dr. Oz's site.  I'll add the video if it becomes available.


A correspondent went to multiple dentists and got multiple treatment plans, some of them quoted with significantly high costs.  This isn't the first such report.  Many years ago, Reader's Digest, did a similar report that got national attention.  PBS did a similar exposé.

 

Is Dr. Oz right?

As a dentist who is passionate about the profession, I can't help cringing when I see these reports.  I cringe for two reasons.  First, I cringe because I know that MOST dentists are consummate and dedicated professionals, driven by a calling to help their patients.  These reports are often sensational, rife with inaccuracies, and perpetuate dental mythologies resulting in fear and avoidance of important dental care.  Even Dr. Oz can get it wrong.  And, that's not good.

The second reason I cringe, is because I know that there is some truth to the reports.  There ARE dental offices that engage in dubious practices that may be driven purely by the desire for financial gain.  I've seen it in my 30 years of dental practice.  I hate it.  But, I've seen it.

The implication of Dr. Oz's report is that if the treatment plan is more expensive, then it must be wrong.  Of course, that's simply not true.

So, who is telling the truth?

Boynton Beach Dentist Dr. Michael Barr
I'd like to first point out that there CAN be differences in opinion between two or more dentists, yet they can all be correct.  There is acceptable latitude in diagnosis and treatment planning (within some limits, of course).  Diagnosis, and particularly treatment planning, can occupy a spectrum that depends on the dentist's training and experience.  It can also depend on the patient's history (medical and dental).  Dentistry is primarily scientifically-based.  But, it can be reasonably argued that the practice of dentistry is a bit of an "art," as well.

For example, when is a "cavity" really a "cavity," and when should it be treated?  The answer is, it depends on many factors.  It depends on how it looks to the dentist.  Is the dentist using magnification (surgical telescopes) and a bright headlight?  (He or she should be.)  X-rays can help, too, but they are not the only test.

White fillings by Boynton Beach dentist, Dr. Michael Barr
Magnified view of a cavity that appears very small on the surface, but is much bigger underneath. 
(Actual case by Dr. Michael Barr at Palm Beach Smiles.  Learn about white fillings here.)


It also depends on the patient's history.  Is the patient 25 years old with half of his / her teeth already filled (lots of cavities in the past), three root canals, two teeth missing, and shows up at the dental office infrequently and usually only when something hurts?  Or, is the patient 45 years old with only two fillings in his / her entire life and never misses a 6-month preventive care appointment?  The first patient should be treated differently than the second patient.  Small cavities might be more aggressively addressed and treated in the first patient.  The first patient may also need more preventive professional care and a strict home care regimen.  A very small cavity in the 2nd patient might be monitored, instead.

Which dentist to treat your teeth?  Trust your gut!

I have long advised people who ask me (both in office and socially), to trust their instincts!  If you don't feel comfortable with a dentist, get another opinion.  A good doctor-patient relationship is CRITICAL.  Is the dentist listening?  Is the dentist taking TIME with you?  Or is the dentist rushed?  Is the dentist discussing the diagnosis and treatment plan with you?  Or is that delegated to someone else like the assistant or business manager?

What is Corporate Dentistry?

There is a trend in dentistry that has followed medicine and optometry.  That is the "corporatization" of dentistry.  Corporations and investment groups are buying up and building multiple-location, large group practices.  These "dental chains" or "dental mills" employ a team of dentists and market heavily.  They are usually "in network" with all the insurance plans, making them attractive to those patients.  "They're on my plan!"   BEWARE.

I've written about Corporate Dentistry previously on this blog.

In a large group practice, you should ask:  Who owns the practice?  Is it a dentist?  If so, where is that dentist?  Does he or she practice in this location (or at all)?  If it's NOT a dentist owner, who is it?  Will I see the same dentist every time I visit?  (These McDentist offices typically have a very high turnover of staff.) 

I've been a dentist for 30 years.  I've seen it all, and I don't like what I see with corporate chain dental offices.  The treatment decisions are often made by MANAGEMENT.  The worker-bee dentists don't get much say.  If they try, they don't last long at the job.  These offices often have "unspoken" rules about treatment planning.  I'll use their words and then explain.

  • "All occlusal fillings become occlusal-facial-lingual fillings."  (There are no 1-surface fillings allowed.  1-surface cavities get turned into more expensive 3-surface fillings.)
  • "All MOD (mesial occlusal distal) cavities get crowns."  (A back tooth that can be adequately restored with a 3-surface filling is turned into a more expensive restoration.)
  • "Most new patients need 'deep cleanings'." (Baloney!  Ask to see your periodontal charting.  Are there multiple deep pockets?  Is there bone loss evident on the x-ray?)
In layman's terms, they are turning a less profitable service into a more profitable service by overstating the diagnosed condition and over-treatment planning.  I hate to say it, but it's true.  And, it's bullshit!  Of course, there are patients who DO need a crown or "deep cleaning."  The question is whether the recommended treatment is driven by corporate motivations, maximizing what can be billed to insurance, or by the dentist's professional judgement?

These "McDentist" clinics have monthly production quotas enforced by "corporate."  Believe it or not, the profit margins in dentistry are fairly thin.  So, when you add layers of people (corporate) who are getting a slice of the pie, you've got to crank up production.  In a traditional solo private care dental practice, after all expenses are paid, there is only the dentist to pay (from profits).  With corporate McDentistry, there are MANY people who need to be paid (who aren't even present at the dental office nor involved in the care of patients).

How do I find the right dentist for me?

Find a Private Care Dentist with whom you feel COMFORTABLE.  Get personal recommendations from friends or coworkers.  Research them online.  Read reviews.  What do the majority of reviews say?  Are they credible reviews?  Look at the dentist's website.  Does the message resonate with you?

Boynton Beach Dentist
The Palm Beach Smiles team!
Dr. Michael Barr, Sandy, Jo-Ann, and Kim

 Once you're in the office, what is the "vibe?"  Is the team happy?  Is it a positive vibe?  Or, do they seem rushed and bothered?  Do they know your name?  Are they running behind with a reception room full of people waiting?  Did the dentist answer your questions?  Did the dentist listen to you?  Were you presented with alternative treatments along with their advantages and disadvantages?  Were the fees explained BEFORE you begin treatment?  Again, trust your instincts.

Thanks, Dr. Oz!

I believe Dr. Oz engages in sensationalism, and his "advice" should be taken with a giant grain of salt.  Especially his dental advice!  Dr. Oz once recommended brushing with lemon juice to whiten your teeth.  Don't EVER do that!  But, I appreciate the opportunity to address the problems he revealed in this episode in a proper, professional context.

Feel free to visit our website at:  Palm Beach Smiles- Boynton Beach Dentist.  Or give us a call at our Boynton Beach dental office:  561-736-2377.  You can also schedule an appointment online by clicking on the button below!

Click here to schedule your appointment online!

Toothache: Home Remedies, Causes, Relief for Sore Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Crest.com

Common Toothache Causes
Are you wondering why your teeth hurt? If you have aching teeth, it may be due to a dental problem such as cavities, gum disease, bruxism, TMJ or a non-dental problem, such as a sinus infection or even stress.

  • Sensitive Teeth: Some types of toothache pain occur if you are using dental care products like peroxide-based whitening agents that penetrate into your teeth causing tooth sensitivity.
  • Bruxism: If you have aching teeth with no signs of tooth decay or gum disease, you may be experiencing bruxism. Bruxism is the technical term for grinding your teeth. Bruxism is a common cause of aching teeth that affects millions of people of all ages in the United States. If you experience aching teeth and other symptoms of bruxism, see a dental professional as soon as possible. If left untreated, chronic tooth grinding can damage crowns and fillings, and wear away tooth enamel, putting your teeth at increased risk for infection or decay. Causes of bruxism that lead to aching teeth include crooked teeth, poor jaw alignment, and stress or anxiety. If bruxism is due to misaligned teeth, straightening your bite with orthodontia could help solve the problem. But if bruxism is due to chronic stress, stress management techniques may be needed to help relieve your aching teeth. Your dental professional may recommend a mouth guard to wear at night to help prevent tooth pain associated with bruxism.
  • Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) Dysfunction: If you're stressed to the point of clenching your jaw and grinding your teeth, you can develop tooth pain associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The TMJ is the joint that hinges the lower jaw to the skull, enabling you to eat and talk. Clenching your jaw and grinding your teeth put additional stress on the muscles of the jaw, which can cause tooth pain. If your tooth pain is caused by TMJ syndrome, your dentist may recommend a TMJ dental splint to reposition the lower jaw. But in less serious cases, warm compresses applied to the jaw, eating soft foods, and taking measures to reduce stress can help.
  • Damaged Teeth: Your toothache pain could be caused by a cracked or broken tooth. If this is the cause of your pain, see your dentist as soon as possible. A broken tooth can contribute to tooth decay.
  • Decayed Teeth: Tooth decay is one of the most common causes of toothache pain. Tooth decay occurs when acids from plaque bacteria penetrate into the tooth enamel causing a loss of tooth mineral which, if it progresses, can ultimately cause pain in the tooth’s inner layer, the pulp.

To read the entire article visit Crest.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:


Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Dental Hygienist

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about the role played by your Dental Hygienist!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Saturday, September 22, 2018

Dentist: Doctors of Oral Health

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about the role played by Dentists!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Choosing Wisely: 5 Things Every Family Should Know About Dental Health (Part 3 of 3)

Don’t replace fillings just because they’re old 












When you have a cavity, the dentist removes it and puts in a filling. These fillings can last for many years, but some people get silver fillings removed because they don’t like the color. However, the process of removing a filling can weaken the tooth. Additionally, insurance may not cover the removal. 

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Diet & Your Teeth

Learn more about the connection between your teeth and what you eat.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Choosing Wisely: 5 Things Every Family Should Know About Dental Health (Part 2 of 3)

Ask about all the options for calming your child during dental procedures 












Dental work can be scary for some kids. Talk with your dentist about ways to help your child stay calm. Tips for a successful dental visit can include making sure your child is not hungry before their dental appointment and scheduling an appointment at the proper time of day.

For jaw pain, try conservative treatments first 












Jaw pain can be caused by stress, arthritis or an injury. A treatment plan for jaw pain should first consist of actions like exercises and anti-inflammatory drugs.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Lifestyle & Your Oral Health

Learn more about how your lifestyle can affect your oral health.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Choosing Wisely: 5 Things Every Family Should Know About Dental Health (Part 1 of 3)

Use toothpaste with fluoride for infants and children 












For children younger than 3 years, you should begin brushing a child’s teeth with fluoride toothpaste in an amount no larger than a grain of rice. For children 3 to 6 years of age, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste.

Consider sealants to prevent decay or treat beginning cavities on the back teeth 












Dental sealants act as a barrier to prevent cavities. They are a plastic material applied by a dentist to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth where decay occurs most often.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Wednesday, August 22, 2018

Dentistry & Overall Health

Learn more about dental care and your overall health.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Sunday, August 12, 2018

How Safe Is Tooth Whitening?

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com 

Over a decade of research has proven bleaching and other whitening methods to be both safe and effective. Several products in the market today have shown no adverse effects on teeth or gums in substantial clinical and laboratory testing. Be sure to look for clinically proven products, follow directions and consult with your dental professional.

In the past, the higher bleach concentrations used in-office treatment resulted in more sensitivity. Today, however, bleaching gels are well buffered, making sensitivity less of an issue. Sensitivity may occur in people after whitening procedures, particularly when they eat hot or cold foods, but usually disappears after 48 hours and stops completely when treatment is stopped.

If you do experience sensitivity, there are several ways you can help eliminate it:

  • If using a tray applicator, wear the tray for a shorter period
  • Brush with a toothpaste made for sensitive teeth that contains potassium nitrate to help soothe tooth nerve ending
  • Ask your dentist or pharmacist for a product with fluoride, which helps re-mineralize your teeth. Brush-on or wear in your trays four minutes prior to and after whitening your teeth
  • Stop whitening your teeth for several days to allow you teeth to adapt to the whitening process. Within 24 hours, the sensitivity will cease. The longer you whiten your teeth, the less sensitivity you will experience

In a few cases, your dentist may discourage dental bleaching:

  • If you have gum disease, teeth with worn enamel, cavities or particularly sensitive teeth
  • If you're pregnant or breast-feeding
  • If you have tooth-colored crowns, caps or other dental work in your front teeth, which can't be bleached

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Sunday, August 5, 2018

Bruxism: Signs And Symptoms

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com 

What is Bruxism?
If you find yourself waking up with sore jaw muscles or a headache, you may be suffering from bruxism - the grinding and clenching of teeth. Bruxism can cause teeth to become painful or loose, and sometimes parts of the teeth are literally ground away. Eventually, bruxism can destroy the surrounding bone and gum tissue. It can also lead to problems involving the jaw joint, such as temporomandibular joint syndrome (TMJ).

How do I Know if I Have Bruxism?
For many people, bruxism is an unconscious habit. They may not even realize they're doing it until someone comments that they make a horrible grinding sound while sleeping. For others, a routine dental checkup is when they discover their teeth are worn or their tooth enamel is fractured.
Other potential signs of bruxism include aching in the face, head and neck. Your dentist can make an accurate diagnosis and determine if the source of facial pain is a result from bruxism.

How is Bruxism Treated?
The appropriate treatment for you will depend on what is causing the problem. By asking careful questions and thoroughly examining your teeth, your dentist can help you determine the potential source of your bruxism. Based on the amount of tooth damage and its likely cause, your dentist may suggest:
Wearing an appliance while sleeping - custom-made by your dentist to fit your teeth, the appliance slips over the upper teeth and protects them from grinding against the lower teeth. While an appliance is a good way to manage bruxism, it is not a cure.
Finding ways to relax - Because everyday stress seems to be a major cause of bruxism, anything that reduces stress can help-listening to music, reading a book, taking a walk or a bath. It may help to seek counseling to learn effective ways for handling stressful situations. Also, applying a warm, wet washcloth to the side of your face can help relax muscles sore from clenching.
Reducing the "high spots" of one or more teeth to even your bite - An abnormal bite, one in which teeth do not fit well together, may also be corrected with new fillings, crowns or orthodontics.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Learn more about the importance of saliva.

Learn more about the importance of saliva.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Sunday, July 29, 2018

The Value of Dental X-rays

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Steve Auger

When you hear the word "X-ray," there's a tendency to envision a youngster sitting around an ER waiting to see if he or she has a broken bone incurred playing sports or just horsing around. But X-rays are just as important to dentists' offices as they are to those of orthopedists. A dental X-ray is invaluable to any dentist in the maintenance of good oral health when treating a patient. Here's exactly what they are and how dentists incorporate them into their practices.

X-RAYS
Your dentist visually examines all aspects of your teeth and gums during a typical checkup. A dental X-ray, however, is a diagnostic tool that allows your dentist to gauge your mouth health through factors he can't see with the naked eye, according to the American Dental Association (ADA). Also called radiographs, X-rays can reveal common issues such as cavities, tooth decay and periodontal disease, all the way to more complex problems such as jaw infections and oral cysts. X-rays aren't just for adults though. Dentists take x-rays of children's teeth for some of the same reasons as adults but also some different reasons.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Children and the dentist
  • Reasons for child dental x-rays
  • X-ray safety for children

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Why Do Gums Recede?

Learn more about why gums recede.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Saturday, July 28, 2018

Do You Mind the (Tooth) Gap?

Many people have gaps / spaces between their teeth.  For some, it's their "look" or identity, and they like it.  There are some celebrities who are known for their "tooth gap":  David Letterman, Madonna, Lauren Hutton, and others.

Some people do not like their own tooth gaps, and they often show up at Palm Beach Smiles asking about options to get rid of the spaces between their teeth.  Depending on each situation, options may include:  6 Month Braces, Porcelain Veneers, Invisalign, or Bonding.

bond teeth gap, fill tooth gap, close tooth spaces, Boynton Beach Cosmetic Dentist, dental bonding.


Yesenia had been considering doing something about the gap between her front teeth for a long time.  Her options included:  6 Month Braces, Porcelain Veneers, Invisalign, or Bonding.  After discussing it with Dr. Barr, she agreed that Direct Bonding was the best option for her.  With conservative Direct Bonding, she knew that there would be no reduction or alteration of her natural teeth.  The cost would be lower, and she would see instantaneous results.  After whitening her teeth, she was able to get this result in a single visit with Dr. Barr at Palm Beach Smiles.  Beautiful!

If you "mind the gap," give us a call at 561-736-2377, or click here to book an appointment online!

Sunday, July 22, 2018

Treatment for Abscessed Teeth

Learn more about the treatment for abscessed teeth.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/