Your Source for Six Month Braces and Porcelain Veneers

Sunday, October 29, 2017

Diabetes and Your Dental Health # 1

November is Diabetes Awareness Month. This month we are featuring information found on MouthHealthy.org that discuss how diabetes can affect  your dental health. Below are two ways that diabetes can affect your oral health.

Gum Disease 












Notice some bleeding when you brush or floss? That may be an early sign of gum disease. If it becomes more severe, the bone that supports your teeth can break down, leading to tooth loss. Early gum disease can be reversed with proper brushing, flossing and diet. Research has shown gum disease can worsen if your blood sugar is not under control, so do your best to keep it in check.

Dry Mouth 











Studies have found people with diabetes have less saliva, so you might find yourself feeling parched or extra thirsty. (Medications and higher blood sugar levels are also causes.) Fight dry mouth by drinking water. You can also chew sugarless gum and eat healthy, crunchy foods to get saliva flowing. This is especially important because extra sugar in your saliva, combined with less saliva to wash away leftover food, can lead to cavities.

To read all '5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Mouth' visit MouthHealthy.org.

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Power Toothbrushes

Dr. Barr uses a power toothbrush himself.  He believes that a power brush is better than a manual brush, IF it's used correctly.  Dr. Barr says, "What matters is how LONG you brush your teeth, not how fast (and certainly not how hard)." 

Most power brushes have a built-in 2-minute timer.  Some of the timers beep every 30 seconds, so you spend 30 seconds on each quadrant (upper right, lower right, upper left, lower left).  If you brush your teeth for the full two minutes (which will seem like an eternity at first), your teeth WILL be clean. 

Of course, the same applies to a manual brush if you prefer.  Just do it for two minutes.  Dr. Barr recommends flossing before brushing.  That way the beneficial fluoride in the toothpaste can soak in between your teeth.


Dr. Barr recommends either the Oral B "Pro" series or the Philips Sonicare.

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about power toothbrushes.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Palm Beach Smiles
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1 -Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Missing Teeth

Are Missing Teeth Leaving Your Smile Empty?

In our culture, a nice smile is part of the "dress code." The "photoshopped"photo is an effective, if not amusing, demonstration of the importance of even a single tooth in your smile. Missing teeth can have a significant negative impact on how people perceive you. Missing teeth carry the stigma of being presumed less intelligent or that you don't care for yourself. This can curb your career path and certainly your social life. 

Missing teeth are quire common. In the U.S., there is an average of 7 missing teeth per adult. And the percentage of adults with no teeth at all is 10%. 

When teeth are missing, the remaining teeth take a heavier load and will be more prone to problems themselves. We normally have 28 teeth (not counting wisdom teeth), and they are designed to work together as a system. Once a tooth is lost and not replaces, it typically begins a vicious cycle of tooth loss. Missing teeth can cause the surrounding teeth to collapse or tilt. This can then lead to bite problems and even gum problems. Missing teeth may also lead to changes in your facial structure and appearance, such as sunken cheeks and flat or drooping lips. 

There are three ways to replace teeth:

(Click on the links to learn about each)
  1. Dental Implants
  2. "Fixed Bridges."
  3. Removable Partial Dentures or Complete Dentures in the case of having no teeth at all. 
Palm Beach Smiles
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1 -Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377

Sunday, October 22, 2017

Risks to Oral Health During Pregnancy

Learn what the American Dental Association has to about risks to your oral health during pregnancy.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Palm Beach Smiles
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1 -Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Six Month Smiles

Now Available at Palm Beach Smiles- Braces Done in Just Six Months!

Tiersa's smile always bothered her. And about 7 months before her wedding, she decided to do something. Porcelain veneers would have been fairly aggressive to compensate for the degree of crookedness of Tiersa's teeth. And Tiersa didnt have two years to spare for traditional orthodontics. 6 Month Smiles was the perfect solution. Her braces came off just in time for the wedding! That's Tiersa in the wedding photo!

Every case on this website is an actual case treated by Dr.
Michael Barr, a general dentist, at Palm Beach Smiles. 
  • Has your smile been stuck in "Cosmetic Limbo?"
  • Have you considered Veneers but didn't want your teeth permanently altered?
  • Were you afraid your only other choice is to have braces for Two Years or longer?
  • Does the thought of being treated while being surrounded by kids turn you off? Keep reading!


Our Boynton Beach Dental Office was the first in Palm Beach County certified by Six Month Smiles to offer 6 Month Adult Braces. In the past, your only choices to correct a crooked smile were traditional comprehensive orthodontics or Porcelain Veneers. 
Today, you can have crooked, crowded, or spaced teeth straightened cosmetically with 6 Month Braces. 


Palm Beach Smiles
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1 -Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Halloween Candy: Your Dental Health Survival Guide

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

With Halloween comes ghosts, goblins and goodies-and the sugar in those treats can play some unwanted tricks on your teeth if you’re not careful. 

Here’s why: The bacteria in your mouth are probably more excited to eat Halloween candy than you are. When the bacteria eat the sugar and leftover food in your mouth, a weak acid is produced. That acid is what can contribute to cavities. 

But don’t hang up your costume just yet. “Halloween is about candy, dressing up and having fun,” says ADA dentist Dr. Ana Paula Ferraz-Dougherty. “It’s OK to eat that candy on Halloween as a splurge as long as you’re brushing twice a day and flossing once a day all year long.”

To help you sort through the trick-or-treat bag loot, we have a rundown of some common candies and their impact on your teeth:
Chocolate
Chocolate is probably your best bet, which is good because it’s also one of the most popular kinds of candy handed out on Halloween. ìChocolate is one of the better candies because it washes off your teeth easier than other types of candy,î Dr. Ferraz- Dougherty says. “Dark chocolate also has less sugar than milk chocolate.”

Sticky and Gummy Candies
Be picky if it’s sticky. These are some of the worst candies for your teeth. “This candy is harder to remove and may stay longer on your teeth, which gives that cavity-causing bacteria more time to work,” Dr. Ferraz-Dougherty says.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article details the following:
  • Hard Candy
  • Sour Candy
  • Popcorn Balls
Palm Beach Smiles
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1 -Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377


Thursday, October 5, 2017

12 Tips for a Healthy Halloween

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

Halloween is around the corner, which for most children means bags of free candy and a chance to build a stockpile of sweets for the winter. No surprise, Halloween can also present parents with a variety of health and safety challenges. “It’s OK to eat that candy on Halloween but it’s important to have a plan,” says ADA dentist Dr. Ana Paula Ferraz-Dougherty. 

Here's how you can help your family stay MouthHealthy on Halloween and year-round.
Time It Right
Eat Halloween candy (and other sugary foods) with meals or shortly after mealtime. Saliva production increases during meals. This helps cancel out acids produced by bacteria in your mouth and rinse away food particles.

Stay Away from Sweet Snacks
Snacking can increase your risk of cavities, and it’s double the trouble if you keep grabbing sugary treats from the candy bowl. “Snacking on candy throughout the day is not ideal for your dental health or diet,” Dr. Ferraz-Dougherty says.

Choose Candy Carefully
Avoid hard candy and other sweets that stay in your mouth for a long time. Aside from how often you snack, the length of time sugary food is in your mouth plays a role in tooth decay. Unless it is a sugar-free product, candies that stay in the mouth for a long period of time subject teeth to an increased risk for tooth decay.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article details the following:
  • Avoid Sticky Situations
  • Have a Plan
  • Drink More Water
  • Maintain a Healthy Diet
  • Stay Away from Sugary Beverages
  • Chew Gum with the ADA Seal
  • Brush Twice a Day
  • Clean Between Your Teeth
  • Visit an ADA Dentist
Palm Beach Smiles
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1 -Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377