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Friday, December 6, 2019

Erosion: Stomach Upset and Your Teeth

Did you know your digestive health can affect your teeth?
Frequent stomach upset can cause a gradual wearing away of the protective enamel on your teeth, a process known as tooth erosion. This can affect the appearance of your teeth and open the door for harmful bacteria that cause cavities.

How Do Stomach Problems Affect My Teeth?

Your stomach produces natural acids that help your body digest food. Sometimes, these acids travel up the throat and into the mouth, especially after a large meal. Ordinarily, our saliva rebalances the acid levels in our mouth and everything’s fine. 
But for those who suffer from gastroesophageal reflux, also known as acid reflux or GERD, gastric acids reach the mouth throughout the day. This process is especially damaging when you’re asleep, since you are swallowing less often and your mouth is producing less saliva.
Another concern is the dry mouth caused by many acid reflux medicines. Saliva not only helps neutralize the acids caused by acid reflux, but also helps to wash away food particles and reduce bacteria that attack tooth enamel. This is why lower saliva production may increase your risk for cavities. 

What Does Reflux-Related Erosion Do to My Teeth?

Acid reflux can wear away the enamel on the inside surfaces of your teeth, as well as the chewing surfaces. Your dentist may notice this during an exam.
Unfortunately, tooth erosion is permanent. If your enamel has started to wear away, you may:
  • Feel pain or sensitivity when consuming hot, cold or sweet drinks
  • Notice a yellowish discoloration of the teeth
  • Find that your fillings have changed
  • Face greater risks for cavities over time
  • Develop an abscess, in extreme cases
  • Experience tooth loss, also in extreme cases
Once erosion occurs, you may need fillings, crowns, a root canal or even tooth removal. Veneers may be an option to restore the look of your smile. 

How to Protect Your Teeth – And Get Relief

  • Chewing sugar-free gum can encourage saliva production, which helps neutralize and wash away the acids in your mouth. Look for one with the ADA Seal of Acceptance.
  • Prescription or over-the-counter fluoride and desensitizing toothpastes may help strengthen tooth enamel. 
  • Avoiding alcohol and smoking and refraining from eating 3 hours before bedtime may reduce the frequency of acid reflux episodes.
  • If heartburn, acid reflux or other stomach problems are part of your daily life, work with your physician on a care plan to treat the underlying causes of your stomach troubles. 
  • If you suffer from acid reflux, see your dentist regularly so they can make sure your teeth stay healthy, recommend ways to prevent tooth enamel erosion and suggest ways to get relief if you are also suffering from dry mouth.
To read the entire article visit mouthhealthy.org
Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Sunday, November 24, 2019

Healthy Dental Habits to Practice During Pregnancy

Being pregnant comes with many responsibilities—and the way you care for your teeth is no exception. For most women, routine dental visits are safe during pregnancy, but let your dental office know what month you are in when you make your appointment. If yours is a high-risk pregnancy or you have some other medical condition, your dentist and your physician may recommend that treatment be postponed. Be sure to let your dentist know if there is any change in the medications you take or if you have received any special advice from your physician. The benefits of receiving dental care during pregnancy far outweigh potential risks. Be sure to keep your dentist informed of any changes in your mouth such as swelling, redness or bleeding. 

7 tips for maintaining a healthy mouth during pregnancy: 


  • Brush thoroughly with an ADA-accepted fluoride toothpaste twice a day. 
  • Floss between your teeth daily. 
  • Purchase products that have the ADA Seal of Acceptance
  • Eat a balanced diet. If you snack, do so in moderation. 
  • Visit your dentist regularly for a professional cleaning and check-up. 
  • If you need help controlling plaque, your dentist may recommend rinsing at night with an antimicrobial mouth rinse. 
  • If you have morning sickness and are vomiting frequently, try rinsing with a teaspoon of baking soda mixed with water to stop stomach acid from attacking your teeth.
To read the entire article visit mouthhealthy.org
Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Friday, November 15, 2019

Sensitive Teeth During Pregnancy: What To Expect And How To Cope

With pregnancy, discomfort comes with the territory. Your body is changing, so a sore back or trouble getting comfortable is par for the course. But while you're piling up pillows to help you sleep at night, you might notice another source of pregnancy discomfort: Your teeth. Sensitive teeth during pregnancy can happen to expecting mothers, and knowing that other pregnant women suffer from the same symptoms might be somewhat comforting.
Nonetheless, here's what may be causing your sore teeth and gums, and how to deal with the pain safely:
Pregnancy Changes
Each of the hormonal changes happening in your body are equally the biggest culprits in tooth and gum pain during pregnancy. From increased blood flow to hyperactive hormones, pregnancy takes its toll. The most common causes of sensitive teeth during pregnancy include:
Hormones. According to the American Pregnancy Association (APA), pregnancy hormones can actually affect the way your body responds to bacteria, which can lead to periodontal infection and – you guessed it – sore teeth and gums.
Increased blood flow. Your body is working overtime to support both you and your little one, which results in increased blood flow in the body. This increased blood flow can create sensitive, swollen gums that are tender to the touch. Hot and cold foods can therefore trigger that sensitivity, even if you've never experienced it before.
Gum disease. Pregnant women are more susceptible to gum disease, which can also be a catalyst for preterm labor, according to a 2010 study published in the Journal of Natural Science, Biology and Medicine. Of course, bleeding, sore and infected gums can definitely lead to a sore mouth and plenty of discomfort.

How to Respond
Although pregnancy can limit some of the medicinal intervention often used to treat sore teeth and gums, with some extra care and attention, you can keep your smile healthy during your prenatal nine months. Maintaining all the great hygiene habits you've used up to this point will keep you healthy and pain-free, so don't forget to give your mouth a little TLC, too. Here are four things you can do for your sensitive teeth during pregnancy:
  1. Choose a soft-bristled brush. Sensitive teeth require a sensitive touch, suggests the March of Dimes. A soft-bristled brush, like the Colgate® SlimSoft, cleans between and around teeth both thoroughly and gently to reduce soreness and bleeding gums into the future.
  2. Take note of the foods that trigger sensitivity. Have you experienced a toothache while drinking tea? Do you find that ice cream puts you in pain? It's best to avoid these "trigger foods." In most cases, according to the APA, sensitivity in the gums goes away after pregnancy, so any subsequent tenderness in your teeth should subside as well, allowing you to indulge in hot and cold foods again in the near future.
  3. Eat fewer sweets. Sugar feeds the bacteria in your mouth, which can lead to cavities and soreness. If possible, reduce the amount of sweets you're consuming. If you must indulge, have a treat and then follow up by brushing to remove this fresh debris from your mouth.
  4. See your dentist. Don't use pregnancy as an excuse to avoid your regular checkup, which keeps your smile healthy even when you're expecting. Just make sure to remind your dentist that you are pregnant, so proper precautions can be taken (like forgoing certain types of x-rays).
It's true that pregnancy means a period of change, especially for your body. But you don't need to endure oral discomfort. Talk to your OB/GYN for safe pain medication suggestions and to ensure that your sensitive teeth don't make for an unpleasant nine months. With consistent professional guidance and personal care, you'll be able to enjoy your pregnancy without worrying about the dental side-effects.
This article is intended to promote understanding of and knowledge about general oral health topics. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your dentist or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition or treatment.

To read the entire article visit
colgate.com

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Wednesday, November 6, 2019

Pregnancy Gingivitis: Symptoms & Treatments During Pregnancy

What is Pregnancy Gingivitis?

Between 60% & 70% of women experience gingivitis while pregnant. Pregnancy gingivitis is very similar to the gingivitis that occurs outside of pregnancy, and can include a mild inflammation of the gums due to plaque buildup, with red and sore gums that bleed when probed. If you have red, sensitive, or swollen gums during pregnancy, you’re not alone.

Pregnancy Gingivitis Causes

There’s a direct connection between pregnancy and bleeding gums. During pregnancy, increased levels of the hormone, progesterone, cause an increased response to plaque bacteria which can lead to gingivitis. As a result, pregnant women are more likely to develop gingivitis. Don’t worry though, knowing how to find the best anti-gingivitis toothpaste and best anti-gingivitis mouthwash will help fight off this disease during a time when the health of you and your baby are your top priority. Talking to your dentist and hygienist about this elevated risk before and during this special time in your life can also help reverse or prevent gingivitis.
 Pregnancy Gingivitis Symptoms
You’ve got a lot going on when you’re pregnant, so your oral health may not exactly be top-of-mind. But because your risk of gingivitis increases, it’s as important as ever to maintain the health of your gums and teeth. Be aware of key signs and symptoms of gingivitis, like red, swollen gums or gums that bleed when you brush.
 Pregnancy Gingivitis Treatments and Prevention

Here are some important things to remember to prevent or treat gingivitis while you’re pregnant:
  • Use an anti-gingivitis toothpaste. Crest Gum Detoxify Deep Clean, helps reverse early signs of gum damage by neutralizing the plaque bacteria build up around your gum line. Ask your dentist if they think you should start using it before, during and after pregnancy to maintain overall oral health.
  • Use an anti-gingivitis mouthwash. Crest® PRO-HEALTH® Multi-Protection Mouthwash, kills 99% of the bacteria that cause gingivitis.
  • Floss at least once a day. Oral-B Glide® PRO-HEALTH® Clinical Protection Floss, slides easily between teeth and below the gum-line to remove gingivitis-causing plaque.
  • Be sure to fully remove plaque. You may be missing the plaque found around the gum line, even if the plaque on your teeth has been removed. Pay special attention to these areas and consider for a toothpaste like Crest Gum Detoxify Deep Clean that can reach plaque around the gum line. The key to a healthy mouth is proper gum care.
  • Tell your hygienist and dentist if you’re pregnant. They may recommend more frequent dental cleanings to help you avoid gingivitis.
  • You may want to consider the breakthrough daily 2-step system, Crest Gum Detoxify + Whitening, which provides gingivitis protection, in addition to noticeable whitening benefits*—so your smile will be beaming, just like you!
If you're pregnant or pregnancy is on your horizon, see your dental professional to evaluate your dental health for any treatment needed prior to and during your pregnancy. With periodontal care included in your pregnancy plan, you can help reduce the risk of developing gingivitis during pregnancy.

To read the entire article visit
crest.com

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377

Thursday, October 24, 2019

What Are Wisdom Teeth?

What are Wisdom Teeth?

Wisdom teeth are the last molars on each side of the jaws. They are also the last teeth to emerge, or erupt, usually when a person is between 16 and 20.

Since wisdom teeth are the last permanent teeth to come in, or erupt, there is often not enough room left in your mouth to accommodate them. This can lead to wisdom teeth that are impacted, teeth that are trapped beneath the gum tissue by other teeth or bone. If teeth are impacted, swelling and tenderness may occur.

Wisdom teeth that only partially emerge or come in crooked can also lead to painful crowding and disease. Since teeth removed before age 20 have less developed roots and fewer complications, the American Dental Association recommends that people between 16 and 19 have their wisdom teeth evaluated to see if they need to be removed.

How are Wisdom Teeth Removed?

A tooth extraction is a relatively routine procedure. Your dentist or a dental specialist, called an oral surgeon, will recommend either "going to sleep" using general anesthesia, or numbing this area in your mouth with a local anesthesia such as Novocain®.

After the tooth (or teeth) is removed, you may be asked to bite down softly on a piece of gauze for 30 to 45 minutes after you leave the office, to limit any bleeding that may occur. Some pain and swelling may occur but it will normally go away after a few days; however, you should call your dentist if you have prolonged or severe pain, swelling, bleeding or fever.

Removal of wisdom teeth due to crowding or impaction should not affect your bite or oral health in the future.

HorizontalImpaction
AngularImpaction
VerticalImpaction
Horizontal
Impaction
Angular
Impaction
Vertical
Impaction
To read the entire article visit colgate.com

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Sinus Infection (Sinusitis): Causes of Sinus Tooth Pain


What is a Sinus Infection (Sinusitis)?

A sinus infection can create pressure and pain in the mouth and cause a sinus tooth pain. Specifically, this is due to pressure and pain in the maxillary sinuses located behind the cheek bones. Sinus tooth pain is often confused with other causes of tooth pain, including gum disease, tooth decay, or an impacted wisdom tooth.

What Causes Sinus Infections?

A sinus infection occurs when bacteria from the nose enter the sinuses. To help you assess whether you have a sinus tooth pain or a toothache caused by something else, take note of symptoms that occur in addition to pain around the upper teeth, eyes, or cheekbones.

Sinus Infection Symptoms

Any type of sinusitis, including maxillary sinusitis, can be chronic or acute. 
Symptoms of acute maxillary sinusitis include:
  • Fever
  • Stuffy nose and nasal discharge
  • Bad breath
  • Pain that is worse when sitting up than when lying down
  • Tenderness, redness, or swelling in the cheekbones
Signs of chronic maxillary sinusitis include:
  • Cough
  • Persistent sinus toothache
  • Pain that seems worse when you have a cold or allergic reaction
Don’t ignore signs of a persistent sinus toothache or tooth pain. Sinus infection when left untreated can lead to more serious infection, so be sure to see a doctor for sinus tooth pain to treat problems before they become severe.

Sinus Infection Side Effects

One of the possible side effects from a sinus infection is that you may start breathing through your mouth. Mouth breathing promotes a dry mouth, and a dry mouth can increase your risk of dental health problems. Saliva in the mouth helps digest food and wash away the bacteria that can cause tooth decay and gingivitis.
If you notice signs of dry mouth after sinus infection tooth pain, try the following:
  • Use a fluoride toothpaste and mouth rinse daily.
  • Drink plenty of water.
  • Try to breathe through your nose as much as possible.

Sinus Infection Tooth Pain

Sinus tooth pain is fairly common, according to dental experts at the Mayo Clinic. Sinus infection tooth pain occurs when the fluid that builds up in the sinus cavities during a sinus infection puts pressure on your upper teeth, which are close to the maxillary sinuses.If you have sinus tooth pain, you may need to see a doctor to manage your sinus condition.
Sinus infection tooth pain might occur suddenly and usually feels like a dull ache, like something pressing down on your teeth. Or you might notice tooth sensitivity when chewing. Sinus infection tooth pain also can occur if you don’t have a full-blown sinus infection. You might notice tooth pain similar to sinus infection tooth pain if you simply have a bad head cold and sinus congestion rather than a full-blown sinus infection.Some conditions that can cause pain in the upper teeth may be confused with sinus tooth pain. Even if you think your tooth pain is related to your sinuses and should be treated by a doctor, see a dentist to rule out dental problems including:
  • Tooth Damage: A fractured or decayed tooth near the sinus cavity has similar symptoms to sinus tooth pain.
  • Tooth Grinding: Tooth grinding (bruxism) can cause pain similar to sinus tooth pain.
  • Gum Disease: The early stages of gum disease can also cause pain similar to sinus tooth pain.

Sinus Tooth Pain Relief

If your sinus tooth pain is caused by sinusitis, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics or antihistamines. If it is caused by bruxism, your dentist may recommend wearing a nighttime mouth guard. Sinus tooth pain caused by tooth damage or tooth decay will need additional dental care, such as filling a cavity.
To read the entire article visit crest.com

Palm Beach Smiles 
Michael Barr, DDS
COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY
650 W. Boynton Beach Blvd, Suite 1- Boynton Beach, FL 332426
(561) 736-2377
http://palmbeach-smiles.com/